Tag Archives: Youth

Feature: Hannah Connor and Flor Macías Delgado

The LIFESTYLE Feature series expands. Tonight we add two new voices to the ongoing conversation. Hannah Connor and  Flor Macías Delgado are two creators and agents of change that come to us from Madrid by way of Washington DC, Mexico City, Los Angeles, Maine, Bologna, and Amsterdam. These two minds engage with the interview on a personal level and bring us their unique perspectives on Reflection and Response and experiences directing the Madrid theatre group “The Auxiliares” for their performances of Eve Ensler’s award winning play, The Vagina Monologues opening on March 11th.

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

HC: I tell people I’m from Washington, DC. I moved there when I was 10 years old and I feel like the city has defined a huge part of who I am. Free museums, beautiful cherry blossom trees, AND Barack Obama, who couldn’t love it?! But I was actually born in a small town in Maine and grew up in a farm house that was 200 years old. My dad wanted to have goats, but instead he had three daughters…

Right now I’m living in Madrid, Spain on a Fulbright grant. By day I teach at a bilingual high school in the outskirts on Madrid and by night I explore the millions of things to do around Madrid, cook exotic foods and play board games.

FMD: It’s a complicated question, really; and never coming to terms with answering that question is what has guided my interests in life. I am originally from Los Angeles, CA but I moved to Mexico City when I was five years old and lived there for ten years. I spent the last three years of high school in Los Angeles, then moved to Philadelphia for college. Besides that, I have lived in Bologna, Italy; Amsterdam; and most recently Madrid, where I’ll be until next summer. After that, who knows. I have yet to figure out my next move! There is so much of the world left to see!

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

HC: Before I go to sleep at night, I often lie in bed and think about three positive or happy things that happened that day. Sometimes they are little things like someone saying hello as they pass me on the street or bigger events, such as, finally finishing a project that I was working on. I think that reflections (whether daily, weekly, or whenever it feels right) is an incredibly important part of being in touch with yourself and the world around you. They are a way of looking back and asking yourself “Am I doing what I want to do with my life? Am I spending my time that way I want it to be spent?”

Reflections are how we notice what is happening in the world. And response is what we do in reaction to those reflections. Our responses are the actions we take to work towards ending injustice and improving the lives of ourselves and those around us.

FMD:I think any art is a reaction, whether it is to a social cause, or your mere inspiration, art is always a response. I want to direct, write and produce pieces that make you reflect about society, and incite an immediate response from the audience. I think that pieces that leave the audience in a happy state of “Aw, that was nice” are a waste of time. I want people to have a definite reaction to my art: be it anger, shock, or even disgust. I want to bring to light issues that are not usually talked about in theater pieces. I am all for the responses.

How does The Vagina Monologues fit in with that definition?

HC: The Vagina Monologues (TVM) and the entire V-day movement is a response to violence toward women. TVM is a play based on interviews with women that raises awareness about issues related to women. The monologues cover a range of emotions and many topics, focusing on women’s sexuality and the stigma surrounding rape and sexual assault. Discussing these issues, especially through a theatrical work, is a powerful way of creating a conversation about these very important topics.

FMD: The Vagina Monologues is all about inciting the audience to reflect on women’s issues and has brief episodes of audience participation. It’s not a play you watch and then go out and live your life the same way. It challenges you to do something to stop violence towards women. At some productions, people are asked to stand if they–or someone they know–has ever been a victim of sexual violence. I am always shocked to see how many women stand up. The first time I was ever involved in TVM I couldn’t believe how many of them were people I knew personally. It really did change me. It made me see that TVM wasn’t just a play, it was part of a movement, and it did more than just entertain people for an hour and a half.

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

HC: In college I studied urban studies, and as a city lover, I’ve been spending my time in Madrid learning about the history and confluence of cultures in the city. Over the next half year, while I’m still living here, I’m excited to continue these explorations.

At the end of the school year I’m planning on moving back to the States and next year I’ll hopefully be teaching in a public school in a city back home. Our urban education system in the United States needs a lot of work and I’m looking forward to becoming part of the movement to fix it. 

FMD: Artistically, I have been quite dormant. I have been working on grad school applications, specifically to Migration and Ethnic Studies programs around Europe. I am interested in working with immigrant teens, and using art and theatre as means for social change. I currently work at two high schools in Madrid and plan cultural activities that challenge the students to look at their culture from a different standpoint. I want them to talk about racism, gay rights, discrimination, abortion, and what those issues mean to them as Spanish teens. I try to keep busy learning French, and getting involved with animal rights activism.

Who or what inspires you? 

HC: More than anything I’m inspired by people who find unique ways to follow their passions and impact the world in a positive way.  Besides these people who make my life interesting and eventful, I’m inspired by the little things that keep me smiling every day: watching the sunrise over the Reina Sofia on my way to work, seeing the masses of people constantly walking on the streets of Madrid, or drinking tea at one of my favorite cafes.

FMD: I am constantly looking for inspiration and find it in the simplest ways. My students inspire me. Working with teenagers is what I want to do in life, and their passion for living is refreshing. They see the world in a different way, they believe they can achieve anything they set out for, and I think that as we get older we lose part of that. We become more realistic and forget the passion we had when younger. I see inspiration in simple acts of kindness. I want to create art that inspires people to do something about the society they live in. I want to inspire change in some way. Lately, I have been obsessed with “What Would You Do?” clips, so I would also have to say that John Quiñones is the man.

Is there anything else you would like the Collective to know?

HC: Come see the Vagina Monologues!! If you are in Madrid, our show is going to be baller. And if you are somewhere else in the world, find a show near you!

And just as importantly: Stay informed on the issues. One in three women on this planet will be impacted by violence in her lifetime. That is an alarmingly high number. The first step in changing those statistics is being aware of the facts. Change comes from within and every person on this planet can do their part in ending violence against women.

FMD: We are really proud of our cast and crew, and cannot wait until we put up our bilingual production in Madrid. Also, we are always looking for help, so if you are in Madrid and want to get involved, let us know at vdaymadrid2013@gmail.com

Shout out to…?

HC: All the “Bobs” of the world! One of the Monologues in TVM,Because He Liked to Look at It, is about a woman who learns to love vaginas after she is with a guy named Bob. Bob loves vaginas and understands how they are magical, beautiful, powerful, and oh so very important (we all came from a vagina!). We need more men like him in the world!

FMD: Eve Ensler, the author of TVM; and all artists, and activists who work hard to make the world a better place. My very own “Bob” and my mom, hi mom!

-Reflection and Response.

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Feature: Michele Jules

This week’s Reflection and Response featured artist is Brooklyn-based writer, educator, academic, and social entrepreneur Michele Jules. With a focus on youth empowerment, Michele utilizes dialogue grounded in historical truths to build toward the future. We’re excited to have her voice participate in the ongoing global conversation on Reflection and Response. Check out her interview and an excerpt from her writing below!

Reflection: Is being able to take in and respect all aspects of art, word and music…

– Michele Jules

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

MJ: Originally from California, Westside! My dad was a Marine… but was raised in Brooklyn, NY. Both, my parents families are live in Brooklyn. Im a New Yorker at Heart!!

I’ve grown here, failed and succeeded here. I still reside in Brooklyn, but I believe my time here in this city is ending, its time to start another chapter in a new setting, set a new foundation. My family will always be here, New York City is my home.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

MJ: Reflection: Is being able to take in and respect all aspects of art, word and music seeing life through others’ eyes. If you can’t relate, you can in some way understand the emotion or point the person is trying to project.

Whether you agree or not, and how it makes you feel and think, your overall reaction is Response.

How does your work fit in with that definition?

MJ: I’m writing my first book, Yay!! I’m all about empowerment of youth, focusing my attention right now on young black women of all ages from their teens to late 20’s and maybe even older.

I see the world through a bigger picture, I’m not the only one on this planet, and I’m at point in my life where I’ve realized, I have to leave something behind and help in projecting better reflections, for the black youth in this world.

And I need help, so I’m sending out a global S.O.S. to black youth, women and men, all over the world. Its a basic interpretation of “If you don’t know where you came from, you’ll never know where your going”, aspect.
I love working with young kids they have so much energy and love for life and laughter. Its important to let them be themselves but be disciplined in teaching them realities of life, their world and the importance of education overall, starting with who they are and where they come from, with no holds barred honesty. That’s the first start to success and the best love story, which starts with yourself.
Young black children have got to see not just their world, but the whole world as a playground. There’s just so many morsels of beauty and genius to take in on this planet.
I’m in total love of this world, my history and I’m also aware of how small we all are compared to the universe, (Let alone the planet Venus), I think that keeps me grounded along with my brutally honest family and friends.
Keeping all this in perspective, I try my best to write realistically and honestly, no sense in sugar coating whats real.

What have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

MJ: Working on a business with a great partner, catering to fitness and pursuing my M.A. in adolescent psychology. Staying focused with writing, which is so hard when there are so many other distractions.

My next project would be focused on young black men, they are harder targets to reach, but i’m gonna give it a shot, with help of-course!

Who or what inspires you all?

MJ: Faith, inspires me, I have a real relationship with God, we have deep conversations. I also, have a great support system filled with family and friends that keep me on track when I lose focus.

Writing, watching children learn, and empowering confidence in youth, by educating them on their history. I feel I’m doing a devotion to my ancestors by educating young children and families.
And of course to me “life” is so great, If I wake up I’m a happy person, I don’t need much to be happy, it’s the little things that count. If it can be fixed, fix it!.. Life is hard..get a Helmet! 🙂

Is there anything else you would like the Collective to know?

MJI have a dire, deep love for animals, they are they only living creatures on this earth who do exactly, what they were put here to do.❤❤

I am big on Education, it’s power, it’s key and it’s the only thing the government can’t take from you.

Shout out to…

MJ: President Obama and Michelle, I Love you Guys! You show us the true meaning of hope, determination and family…

My family and friends and anyone who have helped in anyway to get me where I am today… You’re Awesome! Hug A Tree, peace! God is Love!

The LIFESTYLE for giving an aspiring writer this opportunity…. You’re Awesome too!

Do You Know Your “Real” History? I Know and Love Mine!

Hello World! 

I’m a proud black woman with a passion for the betterment of my fellow black people, especially our children. I love all people, the world is full of beautiful people, but I hear a cry for help within our communities and in black youth and I’m destined to answer that call or at least reach a few cries before they become silent. I hope you enjoy the topics and please comment as your comments are what keep me aware and connected. 

Sincerely,
An 80’s baby doing her part to help…. 🙂

So… I have come to realize so many black people, no matter what background have no idea about thier history and how great it is. And as some of you may not understand how this comes to bother me so much, I say in my defense that it sets a person back when they have no knowledge of where they come from. The struggles of our people were the highlights of our education, while the unbelievable accomplishments and contributions we have made in history were seldom or irrelevant. I come to understand this from working with black children of all ages, now I single out black children only because I relate to them personally. Our futures are merely a reflection of our pasts and so many young children have a dreadful reflection to look at, but that does not determine who they will be if surrounded by the right influences. “It takes a village to raise a child” parents can do what they can, but sometimes it takes someone else to see the value in that child and encourage achievement.
Community is almost completely lost, hard times are getting harder and uniting seems out of the question! Get your hands dirty, learn about yourself , your history and what qualities you bring to the table. Improvise on them! I was once told if you can do something good then perfect it! Your twenties allow you to get to know yourself and the world around you, as young children our parents guide us the best way they know how, in adulthood is where you truly find your own balance and knowledge for your life ahead.Be proud of who you are and especially of where you come from, if you have children teach them this, dont leave it to the television or other young children to knowledge your child. Get involved! I know that it can be challenging to be a parent but with all brutal honesty, you made the choice or was given the blessing to have a child… Now lets get to work!
We must encourage our youth to love themselves, educate themselves and represent themselves!

Peace and love

Jules

Reflection and Response.

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The Porch Swing: Time and Space

Chase: Cat and Mouse, Time and Space, by Samuel Bostick.

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons, Jim Natale.

Chase: Cat and Mouse, Time and Space

Dashing flashes alerted masses of oncoming fury, Danger spoken in voz of crashes—war cries forewarning the unconcerned to take refuge, take arms or get fuck out the city. Deeper than jus a storm, this was the oncoming clash of Titons! Seas churned operationally violent in frightened response to the angered enlight’ment of the mighty Triton, El dios Chac-mool se levantó con sed de la sangre en la garganta.

Thunder, the unseen drummer veiled in ceremonious garbs delivering booms, rocking tombs and prophesying doom. This is jus the beginning, the first stage of gloom, an introduction to battle. It has begun; the vision ancestors scribed down, the dream oral traditionalist foretold, the epic of which the scopes had sung.

Swelling seas of grey, clouds crawling across the sky heavy with the weight of disappoint seeking proper place to unload. To release, to cry out, to Superman Deez–O’s.  Aware; the brewing of a storm demands bare attention.

Chilling thrills ripped in over the coast, howling scowls prowled streets sending summons to spirits and stirring any stagnation that had lay beneath. Cutting quick, shifting swift slashing into and burning mental as the unseen Ginsu unsheathed.

Regret, the ultimate confidence killer…neither time nor space for that.

Still there is hope so take the knife of doubt and self pity away from your throat. Watch the youth, take lesson from their brilliance. The storm ripped out a tree from the ground and threw it into a park. Crashing over the fence it lay in the scene as a testimony to hostile time past. The children won’t be stopped, no way no how. They welcomed this new addition to the playground with zeal and zest! Taking to it as a new prop for playtime adventures; climbing on, running round it, maybe it was a castle or a forest hideaway who knows! Still they were appropriating it in proper fashion. Climbing a tree had never seemed so fun, never so powerful, never so sacred as it did as these young ones reclaimed their space. And they did it with imagination, style and grace. The imagination and awareness to overcome the prelude of tragedy; smiles, laughs, and the simple ability to have a great time…the beauty of youthfulness. I mean these young ones were really ROMPING into that tree!! It was GREAT. These are champions! Turning tragedy to triumph is their badge.

Stay Cool Y’all,

Bostick

Samuel Bostick

@THEREALSHANTS

the LIFESTYLE’s role is to create collective space for active Reflection and Response through the arts. This space is built around dialogue, expression, collaboration, and artistic (ex)change involving international craftspeople and their realities. The Porch Swing series opens up a Reflection and Response residency where we feature a Collective member’s ongoing project through weekly installations.

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Events from the Collective

October 2012

  • Wednesday, October 31 @ 3pm-6pm: Diana Cervera (Live Music)
    • Event: Dia de Los Muertos Celebration
    • Location: Youth UpRising, 8711 MacArthur Blvd. Oakland, CA 94605

November 2012

  • Thursday, November 1 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 8 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 15 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 22 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 29 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE

Reflection and Response.

Events from the Collective is a calendar of upcoming events from the LIFESTYLE collective’s international community. Events can be submitted at anytime to the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com or @LIFESTYLE_RR and will be added to the calendar as they roll in.

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Events from the Collective

October 2012

  • Thursday, October 25 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Wednesday, October 31 @ 3pm-6pm: Diana Cervera (Live Music)
    • Event: Dia de Los Muertos Celebration
    • Location: Youth UpRising, 8711 MacArthur Blvd. Oakland, CA 94605

November 2012

  • Thursday, November 1 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 8 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 15 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 22 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 29 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE

Reflection and Response.

Events from the Collective is a calendar of upcoming events from the LIFESTYLE collective’s international community. Events can be submitted at anytime to the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com or @LIFESTYLE_RR and will be added to the calendar as they roll in.

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Events from the Collective

October 2012

  • Thursday, October 18 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, October 25 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Wednesday, October 31 @ 3pm-6pm: Diana Cervera (Live Music)
    • Event: Dia de Los Muertos Celebration
    • Location: Youth UpRising, 8711 MacArthur Blvd. Oakland, CA 94605

November 2012

  • Thursday, November 1 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 8 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 15 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 22 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE
  • Thursday, November 29 @ Midnight: Peter Muller, Vivian Garcia (Open Mic Music)
    • Location: Triskel Tavern, Calle de San Vicente Ferrer 3, 28004 Madrid, Spain
    • FREE

Reflection and Response.

Events from the Collective is a calendar of upcoming events from the LIFESTYLE collective’s international community. Events can be submitted at anytime to the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com or @LIFESTYLE_RR and will be added to the calendar as they roll in.

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Feature: Ellie Cross

the LIFESTYLE is a place for a global dialogue on creativity, Reflection, and Response associated with the arts. This week we are proud to feature Ellie Cross, whose commitment to community arts has led her to opportunities to interact with people around the world. She currently is part of a team that is starting an International School in Mumbai, India where she will become an art teacher after the school opens its doors in August. Check the dialogue below and view some recent work Ellie has been a part of in Mumbai!

That’s why I love community art projects and arts education, because it challenges the myth of the artist as some talented genius-loner making things that regular people can only appreciate.

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

EC: I’m from Seattle, but I’m living in Mumbai, India at the moment. My day job is helping start up a new International School, where I’ll be teaching art once we open up in August. This has fed my brain as I’ve explored the educational landscape here, plus supported and grounded me as I feed my insatiable inner appetite for community art projects.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

EC: Reflection means your brain thoughtfully digesting things, and according to the dictionary, it also means “the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat, or sound without absorbing it.” I believe the most powerful art does both of these. It shines some truth straight into your face by revealing something that’s been in front of you, previously unexamined. I think that’s what James Baldwin meant when he said: “The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions that have been hidden by the answers.”

As for response, I think art is response. The way I see it, humans are like little dust bunnies that roll around collecting tiny sparkles of dust, aka inspiration. Sometimes a dust-sparkle punches you in the stomach and you lose your breath with the truth of it. Sometimes it just gets filed away unceremoniously into your fold of pre-accumulated dust and it doesn’t germinate until much later. Sometimes it swirls around the tip of your tongue until something else catalyzes it, and art is born! We might create the art as individuals but it’s always the product of much more than that. Which is helpful to remember as an artist, because it takes the weight off of you a bit. 

How do your current artistic endeavors fit in with that definition?


EC: That’s why I love community art projects and arts education, because it challenges the myth of the artist as some talented genius-loner making things that regular people can only appreciate. I do think some artists deserve disproportionate acknowledgement for putting in the 10,000 hours and challenging some incredible ideas into beautiful music/dance/visual arts, etc. I’m just more interested in awakening/nourishing creativity in kids and people that aren’t being celebrated as artists. I also love using art to change spaces, which I see as reflecting back a different reality. Especially in the murals we’ve been doing in Children’s Home, which was previously a jail and no changes have been made to make it feel like a home for kids. Even though painting the walls seems like a relatively superficial solution to a challenging situation, I think that spending the time and investing the thoughtful creative energy into those walls fundamentally alters the space. Especially when the kids have painted it themselves.

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

EC: I’ve been taking a bunch of art classes in the traditional Indian arts. One of my favorites is Madhubani Painting, which is a tribal art form in which anything living gets a double outline. The outside line is the body, and the inside one is the soul. My friend and I wrote a Children’s Book about a kid’s tumultuous relationship with a bean plant, which is based on real life. We’re trying to get it published, so if anyone’s interested I do hope they holler. Also, I’m super excited to do a series of murals called “Blanks” in which certain sections are painted in chalkboard paint, so that passer-by’s can participate in the mural by contributing their chalk art.

Who or what inspires you?

EC: Abdul Sattar Edhi, this 84 year-old Pakistani that has only driven an ambulance in his life because he’s dedicated to helping people. Also, a Ghanaian man named Professor Smiles who believed in art the way religious fanatics believe in God. Caine’s Arcade and all the people that flashmobbed it. Great art blogs, like http://www.thisiscolossal.com/ and kids’ fearless faith that magic is pretty real. And definitely the Christian the Lion video when the lion hugs his long-lost human friends. I always cry with delight at that one.

Is there anything else you would like the Collective to know?

EC: When I tell people I’m either an artist or an art teacher, they quickly respond by telling me they “can’t draw.” I don’t know when being an artist got smooshed into the tiny box of fine motor skills and training associated with drawing, but I’m continually saddened by the fear many people face in the pursuit of artistic endeavors. I also think it’s important that visual arts get added to that often cited proverb from Zimbabwe, “If you can talk, you can sing.  If you can walk, you can dance.”  And if you can make any mark on any surface you can draw. Maybe you can’t draw the way you want to or the way you think the world wants you to. However, when you try and draw a horse and it looks unlike any horse anyone’s ever seen before–you’ve got to respect that horse. Because no one else living or dead could have made it. That doesn’t mean you have to like the horse, and you can definitely try again to make one you like more, but please stop hating on your horse and yourself. You’re not a camera and you’re not a photocopier. We have those now. You’re way more interesting than that.

Shout out to…?

EC: All the friendships, particularly the Art or Choke Collective and my amazing India collaborators that have helped make all the public art possible. The absurdly great family, the steady sweetheart, the internet, revolutionaries, manatees, and all the people doing the good work daily to cultivate love, justice, and magic.

Children’s Home mural project (Mumbai, India)

Check out Ellie’s blog for more information on the Children’s Home mural project and more photos documenting the process!

Also check out Ellie’s website to learn about powerful community arts projects she has facilitated in Ghana, Thailand, Malaysia, Tibet, Cambodia, United States, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala!

Reflection and Response.

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