Tag Archives: Poetry

Artist Feature: Matthew Potter

Matt Potter is a creative writer who grew up in Kentucky and Virginia before settling into San Diego, California. He reminds us that, as artists, we should try to avoid forcing our messages, and instead try to communicate our perspectives in clear ways. Matt also argues that reflection on both positive and negative responses is beneficial to artistic growth, and that past artistic pieces can serve as snapshots of captured Reflection and Response. Woven in throughout the interview below, Matt provides dope perspectives, scenes, and imagery in his poems ColleteCasey’s Last Bat, Night NoisesThe Day Timothy Died, and Three Thoughts on New Orleans. Check it!

Matthew Potter

It is important to reflect on both the negative and the positive responses. Both are going to drive you and hone your craft.

– Matthew Potter

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

MP: Well, I am an Army Brat, so I bounced around a little. Not as much as some, though. I was born in Fort Knox, Kentucky, but spent my formative years in Newport News, Virginia. I’ve been in San Diego, California for the last thirteen years. I was only supposed to be here a year, but California has a way of dilating time.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

MP: In writing, I take it to mean reflection in your own work, or the reflection of others on your work. Often, it takes someone else’s reflection and response to initiate your own. I think as a young writer, it is extremely hard to self-edit (for an old writer too), because you try to put a piece of yourself in that work, and when it doesn’t sync with someone then you want to dismiss them.  When I read my own, or others’ work I ask myself, “What is this trying to tell me?” Not just on the surface but on a deeper level. The point of all art forms is to communicate, so you want the message to be clear. When a poem or story doesn’t work, often the writer’s message is muddled, and the same when my work doesn’t work for others. The best advice I received was from a Creative Writing professor in college. She told us “You can’t jump out of the page and tell your reader, ‘No, you’re not getting it! I meant you to read it this way!’” So, I try to approach everything in that manner, even work e-mails. Granted, there are going to be times where you and your reader are just on different trips, and that same piece will resonate with so many others.

I think it is important to reflect on both the negative and the positive responses. Both responses are going to drive you and hone your craft. Also, I think it is important to go back to old pieces. I have come across pieces I have written years ago, that I thought were great, and came away thinking, “God, did I write this existential piece of crap?” But I won’t throw them away. It is like having a time capsule of your very specific thoughts at that moment.

On a personal level, I probably spend too much time reflecting. It is easy to get caught up in the past and believe you should have done something different. As Jack Kerouac said, “Accept loss forever.” But having said that, I think it is important to take a little time to reflect on your mistakes so you learn from them.

Collete

Oh how I long for a thin-legged French girl named Collete. She would take long drags of her cigarette. Shoot a stream of smoke pushing it through the air, as she rolled her cold black eyes toward a paint-chipped ceiling–exhaling all the stupid things I just breathed into her.

And when she was mad she would huff and stammer in French as she kicked my empty wine bottles across cold wooden floors. She would always be in bed before me, and I would lie on top of the sheets beside her–staring up at our paint-chipped universe alone. Watching Paris spin around me.

And in the morning the sun would breath through pale wind-rustled curtains as shafts of light pry our eyelids open. She would roll over and bury her head in my chest, and we would lie there for an eternity as I engulfed her long dark hair.

How does your work fit in with that definition?

MP: Probably one of the hardest things I find in writing is to have a title that fits your piece, but doesn’t give so much away to your reader. This is probably why I title my pieces after I have written them. It is reflection during the creative process. Occasionally, a title will come to me and I’ll build on it, but it is not the norm. I want to set the tone or a mood with the title, without telling the reader exactly what [the piece] is about. Some of the best poems I have read, Charles Bukowski immediately comes to mind, are ones that have me go back to the title after I have finished reading the poem, and find that the titles are one-line poems themselves. The good ones always make you have that first sip of coffee reaction (the “mmmm. . .” effect). I would love it if my titles could have that response on my readers. I think it is a bit of a cop-out to have too many of your works untitled or have the title be the first line of the poem. Not only for your readers, but for yourself in not reflecting on your piece before you send it off.

Casey’s Last Bat

Every spring, in Havana, when the sugar cane stalks became thick and green

and America still held such promise,

the Dodgers would knock the red clay dust from metal spikes.

Hemingway would breath in the salt soaked air and

run rumrunners down a thick bearded sun burnt throat.

He and Casey would decide who the

Heavy Weight Champion of the World was that night.

Maniacal roar of the home team crowd,

pleading of a Hemingway’s wife,

“Life should be different than this.”

Genius soaked in alcohol and pain,

but he held her tight on warm spring nights

and told her that life was beautiful and worth fighting for.

Shared drinks would bleed into morning,

day’s tomorrow would begin again.

And when October winds had whipped

the baseballs clear of the diamond fields,

Casey’s glove, beaten and worn‐‐sad with the past,

lay stored in an unmarked box in the dark closet.

Casey gathered his strength and lifted not a bat,

but a shotgun and calmly put the barrel to his throat.

Hemingway said, “He did it like a man.”

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

MP: I have several poems that have been published here and there. I would like to get a collection published. Either a chap book or a complete collection. I’ve found it difficult to gather the ones I wish to see published in a collection and come up with a title for that collection. I would say the majority of it is making the time to make it happen. I certainly use the excuse of life’s minutia getting in the way.

Night Noises

You start to hear everything after midnight

in the middle of the week maybe,

when the summer air is thick and heavy.

The buildings are still.

Breeze pushes trees-rustle of leaves,

loud whispers in the night.

Lonely birds that sing at 2 am,

just when you thought everything was asleep.

The hurried scatter of gravel as the cat rushes through,

chasing a cricket or the moon.

 

I focus on my breathing, as if hearing it for the first time.

Thinking about every molecule rushing in and out of my mouth.

Squeaking protest of the bed as I try to get comfortable.

The refrigerator suddenly awakened-hums itself back to sleep.

The faucet that rains tepid drops–pling, pling, plop.

A stray car’s tires rolls across cool asphalt.

And somewhere in the dead streets and abandoned beaches

a barbaric yawp tears through the night,

as morning starts to awaken the rest of the world.

Continue reading

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Events from the Collective

July 2013

  • Tuesday, July 23rd @ 9pm: The Starry Plough Open Mic (Hosted by Joan Pez, performance by Peter Muller)
    • FREE
  • Wednesday, July 24th @ 9pm: The Berkeley Slam (local and touring poets and a live band or special guest DJ, performance from Peter Muller)
    • FREE

Reflection and Response.

Events from the Collective is a calendar of upcoming events from the LIFESTYLE collective’s international community. Events can be submitted at anytime to the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com or @LIFESTYLE_RR and will be added to the calendar as they roll in.

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Events from the Collective

April 2013

  • Wednesday, April 17th @ 9pm: Samuel Bostick Spoken Word at Wednesday Night Slam (Poetry, Spoken Word, Slam)
    • $7
  • Saturday, April 20th @ 9pm: Dayfa Aguas Live (Live Music, Featuring Peter Muller)
  • Sunday, April 21st @ 9pm – 11pm: Open Mic Sessions (Hosted by Peter Muller & Fede Balaguer Valenciano)

Reflection and Response.

Events from the Collective is a calendar of upcoming events from the LIFESTYLE collective’s international community. Events can be submitted at anytime to the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com or @LIFESTYLE_RR and will be added to the calendar as they roll in.

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Feature: Jessica Quick

Aright y’all it’s again that time! This week the Collective welcomes Jessica Quick to the Feature series dialogue! Jessica is coming from a place and space unable to be captured by one setting or time. She brings a perspective shaped through elbow-rubbing experiences traversing time zones across the globe, expressed through her creative writing. Anchored in mood and narrating through observation, Jessica takes the time to dive into her interpretation of Reflection and Response, providing a pint of insight into her path thus far. Take a look at her interview and her poem Daffodils below. Enjoy the ride; Bon Voyage.

Jessica Quick

A city’s mood, its mannerisms, its charisma (or lack thereof) reflect in its inhabitants and its architecture, and I like those things to feed into my reconstruction of a city through words.

-Jessica Quick

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

JQ: I’m from Simi Valley, California, a synclinal suburb squatting outside of Los Angeles. Its geography and demography made it perfect for routine brush fires and a large population of conservative right-ists when I was growing up. It’s an awkward little city, and I’ve come to appreciate its quirks. In doses.

 In the past few years, I’ve lived in Harlem, Seoul, San Francisco, Madrid, and I’ve just relocated to Brooklyn a week ago. I’m looking forward to sticking around and getting back in touch with some old literary haunts, as well as my writing projects. I’m juggling a few ideas, and I think New York is the perfect place to explore them.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

JQ: Reflection! A necessary trait of response that’s learned with time, I suppose. I’ve traveled a bit, and it always takes me a long time to arrive at a place where I feel I can appropriately reflect on a city. What I like to do is feel out (and up?) places through my writing. I love infusing their bodies into my poetry. A city’s mood, its mannerisms, its charisma (or lack thereof) reflect in its inhabitants and its architecture, and I like those things to feed into my reconstruction of a city through words. Like getting to know someone new, attaining depth of a place just takes a little time. I wrote about New York when I was in Seoul, about Seoul often when I was in Madrid. And I still haven’t touched my hometown.

How does your writing fit in with that definition?

JQ: Although I like using my travel experience in my writing, I try to avoid relying too heavily on personal perspective. For example, I like creating stories that are not necessarily my own, but in a setting with which I’m familiar. Or I’ll use a mood that I may have felt in a certain city, but explore new lyrical narratives in a poem. I strive towards creation and embellishment over accuracy in retelling my response to a place. Maybe that makes me a liar. But I like telling stories. I think it’s boring and a bit vain if they’re all mine.

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

JQ: I’m working on my first poetry collection, The Liminal Parade. It’s about spaces between here and there. I like writing about travel limbos, like subways, elevators, long plane rides. I’m also paying attention to certain psychological in-betweenness that mirror in those subways, elevators, and long plane rides – traveling for long periods of time without destination, waiting for someone to arrive, and indecisiveness are things I’m teasing out in my poetry. I like writing about hybrid existences because it hits close to home, both with my travel and with my mixed ethnicity. I’ve dwelled in the in-between and it’s an awkward, beautiful place.

I have a few other projects in mind for the future and the now. I’ve been talking to a few artists about comic book ideas and collaborations on creating some illustrated poetry, which I’m very excited about. I’m a huge comic fan, and the prospect of writing one makes my nerd heart skip a beat.

Who or what inspires you?

JQ: On the topic of comics, Daniel Clowes and Jason Lutes are my favorites for their dark humor and stark aesthetics. The Hernandez Bros. and Chris Ware are also stunning, although Ware makes me want the world to be a better person.

For poets, my current obsession is Frank O’Hara because I spent so much time writing about him for my MA thesis, which compared O’Hara and Lorca’s poetry in New York. I appreciate his unabashed exhilaration with life in his poetry, and how much his personality shows. And if O’Hara were still alive, I’m pretty sure he would be the coolest person in the world.

Of course, big cities inspire me as well as the people I meet. I am indebted to the city dwellers – from the rush hour flautist in Tokyo to my life-long companions. They accompany my memories of the cities I have grazed in my wanderings.

Is there anything else you would like the Collective to know?

JQ: We are poised in an interesting moment in history. From the state of the world economy, to the persistent race for technological advancements and subsequent dependency, we are witnessing rapid change in the world around us. We are responsible for how we choose to respond to these changes. To artists, I encourage you to create something beautiful in reflection of the environment around you.

 Shout out to…

JQ: Big love to all the creators and rabble-rousers. You make the world go round. And a big shout to a very talented jazz musician, my inspiration, and my husband-to-be, Daniel Stark.

Daffodils by Jessica Quick:

Daffodils

The first poem I ever wrote

was written by Wordsworth,

a posture of lines followed by

a school teacher’s request:

“Please see me after class.”

 

I never showed and

swallowed my first D –

literary theft on record

as enraged or defensive.

 

Years later, I found myself

writing poem after poem about daffodils.

Bought them any chance I could get.

I filled large suitcases with piles

of laughing heads and moved

to distant corners of the world.

 

Every town I visited,

I left solitary specimens

behind nondescript buildings

and cheap hotel rooms.

I remember one figure

splayed out like a brown

carcass of envy squatting

on the menu of a fish restaurant

in old Beijing.

 

After the last, I moved to an island at the edge of a map,

where (they said) daffodils could never grow.

I spent my days planting gardens near tough rocks.

At night, I counted holes in obscure constellations

where great, big, burning stars used to be.

Keep up with more of Jessica’s work at her website: www.jessicaquick.wordpress.com

Also check out Penumbra Magazine, which Jessica co-founded in 2012. She is currently the Poetry Editor for the magazine: www.penumbramagazine.wordpress.com

Reflection and Response.

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The Porch Swing: Time and Space

Whas up y’all,

I’m still in the Lab on this one, cookin’ up the proper swing. I feel the most responsible decision is pushing the release of the second installation back to next week, Time and Space, “Break”  will drop the 21rst of November. Thas right before Thanksgiving so let’s see what we can shake up. Thank you all for keeping up with the project and for keepin’ me on my toes. I’m not gone leave y’all empty handed though, I got a lil jig for y’all to groove on. Enjoy.

Live from the Workbench,

Samuel Bostick

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons, Jim Natale.

 Flowers make the world go round, Frowns turned to smiles

Blues take flight leaving behind a tune called delight

She has a great natural look, still she absolutely Shines ‘round flowers….something about ‘er

Jus some thoughts from a young romantic…

May spirits be up or down, the air is bound to change when flowers and plants are ‘round

To those who disagree: you may be moved neither today nor tomorrow, Still one day the power of floral beauty will strike either adding joy to a festivity or knock the edge off a heavy gloom. Receive your blessing.

Fluorescence of purple pedals on grey day, electronic shining under grey skies, standing proud—radiance profound, royalty in elegance and gown.

Field notes from a country kid…

The life, the growth, the way they smile and perk up, how they ask for water,

The freshness of air, the softness of petals, they feel, we feel each other

A relationship unique, breaths in cycle, refresh

Life arrangement we connect…intimacy, appreciation, beauty, respect.

Kiss a rose.

Scribbles off a green thumb…

Give a flower, show some Love.

Grow a plant, may it bloom—rejoice the power of botany, cooperative living.

Samuel Bostick

@THEREALSHANTS

the LIFESTYLE’s role is to create collective space for active Reflection and Response through the arts. This space is built around dialogue, expression, collaboration, and artistic (ex)change involving international craftspeople and their realities. The Porch Swing series opens up a Reflection and Response residency where we feature a Collective member’s ongoing project through weekly installations.

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Patchwork: Questions, No. 2

Installment No. 2: The Things That Bring People Together.

The Patchwork: Questions collaboration series involves a process of reconstructing the written word. Through weaving together words from Samuel Bostick’s Questions project, I seek to create opportunities for readers to visually interact with original texts. The content for this piece comes from Questions, Take 3.

From Patchwork: Questions, No. 1 (All Good Things Don’t Last)

I’ve always been interested in the aesthetics of words and lettering, and Samuel’s “Questions, Take 2” from a couple weeks ago inspired me to explore this interest in a new way. I built this piece similarly to how one would build a poem word by word, line by line, but I looked at re-interpreting several visual characteristics such as font, color, size, and placement. Starting at the beginning of Samuel’s poem, I gradually wrote down each line,  but without a linear structure. Lines that were successively linked in the original writing were separated, and other lines were either layered over them or woven through them.

To me, breaking down and re-creating the original poem opens up the text to multiple new meanings and readings that may have been submerged previously. Words and lines that are woven together or placed near each other can be read separately to retain their original meanings but can also be read together to form new sentences with expanded meaning. This is another example of what I think of as “visual sampling,”  where the viewer’s interaction with the piece is a central part of the process of visually breaking-down and reconstructing Samuel’s powerful words.

Reflection and Response

V.

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Patchwork: Questions

I’ve always been interested in the aesthetics of words and lettering, and Samuel’s “Questions, Take 2” from a couple weeks ago inspired me to explore this interest in a new way. I built this piece similarly to how one would build a poem word by word, line by line, but I looked at re-interpreting several visual characteristics such as font, color, size, and placement. Starting at the beginning of Samuel’s poem, I gradually wrote down each line,  but without a linear structure. Lines that were successively linked in the original writing were separated, and other lines were either layered over them or woven through them.

To me, breaking down and re-creating the original poem opens up the text to multiple new meanings and readings that may have been submerged previously. Words and lines that are woven together or placed near each other can be read separately to retain their original meanings but can also be read together to form new sentences with expanded meaning. This is another example of what I think of as “visual sampling,”  where the viewer’s interaction with the piece is a central part of the process of visually breaking-down and reconstructing Samuel’s powerful words!

Lets have a running dialogue in the comments section considering patchwork phrases and meanings that resonate with y’all! Looking forward to your input.

Reflection and Response

V.

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Feature: Jorge Pascual Blanco

Jorge Pasucal Blanco esta en motión. Nació en León donde desarolló su creatividad y empezó de destacarse como actor y escritor. Cómo actor, ha interpretado monólogos como una adaptación de  la obra de Michel Houllebecqe comp parte de la presentación “Ampliación del campo de batalla,” en la Facultad de Cine, La Bañeza. También interpretó “Polizones,” presenaciones multidisciplinarios en el Centro civico León-Oeste

Como escritor, ha sido publicado en Leteo varios veces: ““Morir de viento,” y  “Petit Comité.” En 2006 recibió un Accessit en el premio “Eugenio de Nora.”

Su estilo personal y emotivo viene de su experiencia multidisciplinaria. Acutalmente presenta obras innovadores como “Pilasia,” que se presenta como una mezcla de pilates y poesia. Abajo aparece la entrevista y ejemplos de obras del artista.

Jorge Pascual Blanco is a person in motion. He first developed his creative interests as an actor and writer while growing up in his hometown of León in Northern Spain. As an actor he interpreted stage productions of Michel Houllebecque’s “Ampliación del campo de batalla,” in the Facultad de Cine, La Bañaeza. He also performed “Polizones,” a multidisciplinary presentation at the Centro civico León-Oeste.

As a writer he has been published various times in Leteo: “Morir de viento,,” and “Petit Comité,” represent two of his most important works, among others. In 2006 he was awarded  an Accessit for the prestigious “Eugenio de Nora,” award.

His personal and emotive style is informed by his multidisciplinary background. Currently he performs innovative works such as “Pilasia,” which mixed pilates and poetry. Check the interview below and links to examples of Jorge’s work.

Para empezar con algunos puntos básicos, de dónde vienes? Dónde estás?

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

JPB: Yo vengo de aprender mucho en algunos cursos de formación teatral y sobre escritura creativa, performances y sobretodo he aprendido en otro nivel en algunas exposiciones que he hecho de mi trabajo en varios locales aquí o allá. He oído recitar y expresarse poéticamente de manera muy personal y en otros casos de manera muy pobre.

Así que ahora me falta regresar a la teoría un poco, probar a mezclar estos lenguajes artísticos, experimentar otras cosas. Leer mucho de la vida y de los libros..     

JPB: My backgrond is in theater, creative writing, performance, and I have done various shows and expositions at various venues. I have heard poets and other artists express themsevlves in a a moving and personal way and also others in a much less interesting way.

I need to revisit theory a bit, to try and mix these artistic langauges, and to experiment with new things. Also, to read from life and read from books…

Que quiere decir reflexión y respuesta para ti?

What does reflection and response mean to you?

JPB: Yo, como ya he dicho vengo del mundo del teatro, aunque me guste todo tipo de lenguajes.. eso depende del qué hacer.

La reflexión para mi es todo el proceso que consciente o inconscientemente te ayuda a recopilar información para echarla a la “pila” del mundo emotivo o sensitivo o mundo más visceral.

La respuesta es todo aquello, que después de haber pasado la parte de reflexión, se acumula, para de manera consciente, mediante impulsos, transcribirlo al lenguaje creativo, sea el lenguaje que sea.

Por supuesto que el orden no tiene por qué ser lógico, se puede por supuesto tener una reflexión profunda después de una respuesta, incluso esto es más artístico si cabe.

Para mi “respuesta” es el poema en sí, y “reflexión” es todo aquello que influye a la hora de escribir el poema, ya sea mucho antes de haberlo hecho.

Puede  pasar, que se tenga un poema y no se llegue a escribir nunca. Eso pasa porque no se indaga qué herramientas hacen falta, o son más necesaria, para ese poema…o puede ser que no llegue el momento preciso para hacerlo. Puede ser que cuando nos encontremos en la vida ante algo que queremos que pase,  ese poema salga solo por pura inercia, por tanto pensar en ello, en ese viaje, en esa chica, cuando no te enteras estas recitándolo. ¡Eso es GRANDE! .

También.. yo definiría reflexión como una consecuencia de estar en contacto con el mundo en todo su lirismo, por ejemplo estar en contacto con elementos, objetos de un personaje ficticio de teatro, entonces esta respuesta se podrá dar de manera muy lúcida como pequeñas verdades al actuar, segundos perfectos que sacarán al espectador de su butaca.

 “Debes comenzar a amar el arte en ti mismo y no a ti mismo en el arte” K.Stanislavsky

JPB: As I mentioned before I come from the world of theater, although I do enjoy all types of creative language…depending on its use

For me, reflection is a concious and or/unconcious process that helps one take in information in order to access the emotional/sensisitive/visceral world.

Response is all that information accmulates after reflextion has occured and can be translated into creativity through concisous or impulsive action.

The order in which the two processes occur isn’t necesary logical: one can experience profound reflextion after response, which can be an artistic triumph.

I would say that the poem itself represents “response” and reflextion is all that influnces its creation, from a long while before the writing to the event of makign the poem. This happens because one need not invrstigate tools or methods that aren’t being used, are needed for whatever poem, or because the right time for the poem never comes. Perhaps a poem comes out when we find something desirable in life and we think in that event, trip, that woman, without knowing. This is HUGE!

I would also define relfexion as a consequence of being in contact with the world and all it’s lyrcism, with natural elements, ojects that belong to created characters onstage. This makes for a lucid response with small bits of truth, seconds thta transport the audience from thier seats.

“Love the art in yourself, not yourself in the art.” K.Stanislavsky

Cómo se mete tu arte en esta definición?

How does your art fit in with this definition?

JPB: La poesía es pura intuición.. pero claro.. si sólo me fiara de mi intuición, escribiría poco..jaja.. Uno escribe con intuición (..cuando la tiene..), pero debe recopilar toda esa intuición.. Darle ritmo, sonoridad con sonidos de “r” o de “L” o escribirla con forma de desierto o de mar, o darle aspecto de plato con esa forma oval..

Hay demasiadas estructuras, herramientas estilísticas, para darle forma a un texto, lo que hace falta es conocer su por qué y así darle la forma adecuada, usar las herramientas precisas para darle ese por qué  y pueden ser muy variadas si el texto tiene fuerza.

Si uno sabe el por qué se ha escrito ese texto.. puede ser un texto amoroso y darle una forma de diálogo de una mujer y un hombre, así uno se puede acercar a uno mismo y sentir qué cosas diría o no..

Mi arte se mete en la idea de la vivencia personal. Yo escribo de determinada forma, triste, melancólico, onírico, dependiendo de qué vivencias tengo , eso es para mí “reflexión” y luego tengo multitud de “respuestas” en torno a ese poso de experiencias que pueden ser rabia, amor, expectación, ensimismamiento.. etc como todos tenemos respuestas, yo tengo esas respuestas que se crean automáticamente en mí, en mi arte, como consecuencias de esas vivencias; mediante una especie de liberación.

Hay una liberación en el arte, el arte es algo para mí liberador, y muy estimulante, ya que en ese proceso, nos conocemos a nosotros mismos.. esto es labor de toda una vida.    

JPB: Poetry is pure intiuition..but of course… if I only trust intuition I would write little..One writes wit intuition (when its there) but that inutuion should be compiled together and igven rhythem and sound with sounds such as “r,” or “L,” written as if it were the desert or the sea, or given the oval shap of a plate.

There are so many structures, tools, amnd skills,to form a text however with a reason for a text an artist can choose its form and use skills and techniques that convey this meaning. Good texts can have various techniques that work to convey meaning.

When one understands why he or she has written a text, be it a romance between a man and a woman, one can get closer to the self and feel thigns that the artist feels.

My art comes from personal experience. Depending on events in my life, I write from various perspectives, sadness, meloncoly, dreamy. These perespectives are my reflexion and then there is a multituld of reponses based on these emotional deposits such as rage, love, hope, enthusiasum, self-absorbtion..etc just as we all expereicne responses, these are examples of responses that automotically come from me and through in my art as a result of these lived experiences.

Within art there is a liberation: art is important stimulant for my inner liberator. It’s stimulating because we get to know ourselves much better which is a lifelong search.

Que más estás haciendo actualmente? Que proyectos estás pensando trabajar próximamente?

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

JPB: Estoy intentando acabar un poemario para mi novia que se va a ir a San francisco y no voy a verla en tiempo, y eso es importante. 

Quiero seguir aprendiendo a recitar con “free jazz” igual algo más ligero..ufff

Quiero hacer algo con un escultor en una galería de arte Amancio González a través de dibujos y poemas y el hilo conductor del vino como elemento socializador (..)

Y no sé qué proyectos me deparará el destino. Escribir algo que refleje cada vez más lo que siento en ese momento..irme acercando a mi verdadero lenguaje interior.

JPB: I am trying to finish a book of poems for my girlfriend who is going to San Fransisco soon, whish is important for me.

I want to continue learning how to recite with “free jazz,” and something lighter…

 I want to do a project with scultpor Amancio Gonzalez withdrawings and illustrations, poems, with the focal point as wine.

Who knows what projcts destiny has in store for me. I will focus on writing poems that focus on the current moments..approaching my true inner language.

Quien o que te inspira?

What or who inspires you?

JPB: La similitud de la naturaleza con las sensaciones y vivencias humanas. El amor. Las mujeres que saben ser ellas, los hombres que saben ser ellos.

La debilidad humana. La pasión. El romperse por dentro haciendo algo..

La manera de amar.

Un botón, un alfiler, unas zapatillas, la distancia entre las personas ..las físicas y los obstáculos que nos ponemos.

Un niño mirando las nubes. Una chica que se peina.

 Garazi.

JBP: Similarities between nature and human emotion and lives expierence. Love. Women that know to be themselves and men that know how to themselves.

Human weakness. Passion. Breaking up inside doing something.

Ways to love.

A button, a pin, shoes, distance between people, physics, and obstacles that we creative.

A child lookign up at that clouds. A girl combing her hair.

Garazi

Hay algo más que quieres que sepa el Collectivo?

Is there anything else you would liek the Colective to know?

JPB: Querría saber más del colectivo y conocer más sobre sus inquietudes.

Pero así en general que estoy abierto a escuchar proyectos e investigaciones, colaboraciones para aprender.

“El arte no imita a la vida,  la vida hace el amor con el arte..”

JPB: I would like to learn more about the collective and more about it’s fears.

In general I am open to new projects, investigation and collaborations to learn more.

“Art doesn’t limit life, life makes love with art.”

Saludos a….?

Shout out to?

JBP: Peter , Gracias por todo.

Garazi que tengas buen viaje…

JBP: Peter, thanks for everything.

Garazi, have a safe trip.

Ahora pasan las hojas anegadas de tiempo por la lluvia reciente..
Pasa el viento como las ráfagas de los flechazos, como pasado esparcido en el rostro
y agua fresca arrojada al despertarse..
como recuerdo

Kilómetros: Una colaboración con ilustrador Pablo García.

Kilometers: A collaboration with illustrator Pablo García

Snapshot #1

Shanpshot #2

Poesía grabada en casa de Alfonso en León:

Poem recorded at Alfonso’s house in León:

Reflection and Response.

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Snapshots From the Collective

Untitled by Jorge Pascual

 

 

Reflection and Response.

The Snapshots From the Collective series works to create a space for Reflection and Response through photography. ANYone who wants to contribute ANY photos to this project can email us submissions at the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com. One photo will be posted each week, and photos will only be used for the purposes of this series. Thank you and we look forward to building and expanding the Collective!!! -P & V

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Snapshots From the Collective

Untitled by Jorge Pascual (Letra from San Sebastián-Doností  País Vasco, España)

Reflection and Response.

The Snapshots From the Collective series works to create a space for Reflection and Response through photography. ANYone who wants to contribute ANY photos to this project can email us submissions at the.lifestyle.rr@gmail.com. One photo will be posted each week, and photos will only be used for the purposes of this series. Thank you and we look forward to building and expanding the Collective!!! -P & V

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