Tag Archives: filmmaking

Artist Feature: Bosa

I first met the dude Bosa in Madrid, Spain when I was looking for someone to pick up my MIDI keyboard and PA speakers before I moved back to the US. Upon meeting him, it was dope to know that this equipment would be going to someone active and dedicated to his craft. Bosa is a composer, videographer, and rapper from New Jersey that is currently based in Madrid. Already having put out numerous records, his upcoming debut album Futures We Remember is currently in production with a release date at the end of the summer. Bosa starts off his interview with a LIFESTYLE feature first!! He breaks the ice with an original video featuring a verse on Reflection and Response along with further ideas stemming from the interview questions and shout outs to the many people he is working with in Spain. In the accompanying written piece, Bosa discusses his new record as an example of musical Response and also lets us know that it’s important to live the arts we practice, not just use them in our daily lives. Bosa is quickly becoming a fixture in the musically active landscape of Madrid and we look forward to witnessing his future work. Peep the dialogue below and be sure to check out the pics and clips Bosa has provided along with his groundbreaking intro video!

Bosa | Photo by Khaelin Damm

Bosa | Photo by Khaelin Damm

My first album, “Futures We Remember”, is a musical response to the reflection I hope to see of myself when I look in the mirror. The meaning of that is up for interpretation. For me it refers to all the dreams I have about music and the life that accompanies it.

– Bosa

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

B: I was born and raised in Lumberton, New Jersey. It’s your everyday suburban town, not far from Philadelphia. I also spent four wild years at Syracuse University “studying” broadcast journalism.

Since I finished school a few years back I’ve been living in Madrid, Spain. It’s my little heaven on Earth and I can’t imagine leaving anytime soon. It’s a city full of life, culture, and groovy people. Also an absurd amount of jamón.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

B: At this point in my life “Reflection and Response” means finally taking a complete leap of faith as an artist. A good friend of mine told me one simple thing that has always stuck with me.

“My brotha, you can’t make music or do art you have to live it” – The Other

It’s not a crazy concept to understand but it’s one hell of a task to actually do. Music is everything for me. I think about it the same way one would crush on the cute girl in grade school. I daydream about concerts and making the perfect song a thousand times a day.

Reflecting on this I know I’d never forgive myself for not asking out music before the big dance. So my response is to do everything in my power to get her to notice me.  

Bosa | Photo by LABL FOTO

Bosa | Photo by LABL FOTO

How does your work fit in with that definition?

B: My first album, “Futures We Remember”, is a musical response to the reflection I hope to see of myself when I look in the mirror. The meaning of that is up for interpretation. For me it refers to all the dreams I have about music and the life that accompanies it. My friends always tell me I have a hyper-active imagination. For better or worse I always try to conjure up ways to turn my ridiculous ideas into reality.

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

B: Outside of the album I’ve been secretly working on dance moves (the same way Zoolander worked on Magnum) and a big release party at the end of the summer. Madrid is one of the funkiest cities I’ve ever been to and it has revived my obsession with disco and Motown culture. If you invite me to your party expect Earth, Wind, & Fire and a Soul Train line to take over your dance floor rather quickly.

The Groovestep era is here Generation-Y. Prepare yourselves.

Who or what inspires you?

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Artist Feature: Mina Fitzpatrick

I first met Mina Fitzpatrick in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We stayed in touch over the years and it was dope to connect over a LIFESTYLE Artist Feature about her filmmaking work. Mina has been living in Seoul, South Korea for the past two and a half years working on Two Together, a documentary film following the lives of 3 single mothers in South Korea, where single mothers often face significant social discrimination and pressure to give up their children for adoption. This is Mina’s first film and she notes the importance of taking the time to learn as much as possible about the craft while she works on the product itself. For this artist, Reflection and Response involves slowing down and giving the required time to reflect instead of responding immediately. Mina and her co-documentarian Tom Krawczyk are currently starting the editing process, so peep the Two Together website for updates on a release date!

Mina Fitzpatrick

To me, reflection and response reject the idea of immediacy, and instead demand time and patience from your work. So often we are caught up on the idea of responding to something, that we forget to reflect on it first. 

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

MF: I’m originally from Seattle, Washington. I was born in Vermont and moved to South Korea when I was five years old. I spent most of my young adult life growing up in Seattle, and went to college in Houston, Texas. Now, I’ve found my way back to Korea, and have been living here for the past two and a half years. I love living in Seoul, with its fast-paced lifestyle, delicious food, and lively people. Definitely a place I’m proud to call home.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

MF: To me, reflection and response reject the idea of immediacy, and instead demand time and patience from your work. So often we are caught up on the idea of responding to something, that we forget to reflect on it first. 


Two Together Documentary TRAILER: http://twotogetherdocumentary.weebly.com/

The decision to raise a child as a single mother is never an easy one. In Korea, where unwed motherhood is highly stigmatized, the decision is especially difficult. For many years, the Korean government played no small role in influencing this decision. Instead of offering financial and social support to unwed mothers, the government opted for a system that seemingly swept the problem under the rug: overseas adoption. Today, Korea has the largest adult population of adoptees in the world, and the vast majority of Korean adoptees are the children of unwed mothers.

This documentary follows the stories of three different women. While their stories are different, each demonstrates the need to give women back the right to decide. It advocates for a society in which mothers can choose to raise their own children. 

(http://twotogetherdocumentary.weebly.com/about.html)


How does your work with the documentary “Two Together” fit in with that definition? 

MF: As a novice filmmaker, this project has been a huge growing experience. I feel excited to have found a profession in which I feel just as excited about the “artistic process” as I do about the finished product. You know that old saying, “Anything worthwhile is worth the wait”? Taking time has not only allowed me to reflect on the characters, and their stories, but also on myself, and my role as a filmmaker. As I reflect, I am able to create a response that is deeper, and more meaningful to me, and hopefully to my audience. 

Two Together Documentary - Process

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

MF: At the moment, most of my energy is focused on this project, as we are just beginning the long editing process. When I’m not working on the documentary, I usually spend time doing things that will help me become a better filmmaker, whether it be reading, writing, taking photographs, watching other documentaries or practicing Korean. When I move back to the States, I hope to work on some more local projects, maintaining a focus on social-political issues, and giving a voice to those who are rarely heard. 

Two Together Documentary - Process

Who or what inspires you?

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Artist Feature: Franz Rothe

We’ve been fortunate enough to have become close friends with Dresden-born musician, writer, and filmmaker Franz Rothe over the past year here in Brooklyn, and his versatility and creative output are huge inspirations for us. In an insightful interview, Franz guides us through his perspectives on Reflection and Response, explores how these concepts fit in with his musical process, reflects on a recent album called Away that he worked on as part of the band Franz & Frau Schneider und dieser Andere, and talks through various current projects. Let’s dig in:

Franz Rothe

I believe that the urge to write a song results from the need to capture and express a certain feeling…You chase this feeling, this impulse, because it is haunting, like something you have once known but forgotten. And you try to figure out what it is, what it wants to be, how it wants to sound.

– Franz Rothe

Leading off with some basics, where are you from? And where are you at?

FR: I am from a beautiful city called Dresden in Germany. But I have been living here and there in the recent past. Right now I live in New York, which is wonderful but won’t last very long either.

What does Reflection and Response mean to you?

FR: I think that, in a way, Reflection and Response describes the very essence of music or really any kind of art. I believe that whatever we create can only be seen as a response to what we have seen, heard or experienced before. At least I would say about myself, that I’ve never come up with any kind of idea that was not a response to something somebody else did before me. We reflect upon our experiences, our impressions, and we respond to them – knowingly or not – and sculpt them into something new.

Pessimistically, that view could lead to questioning the mere idea of originality, as everything is just a combination of what was there before. But on the other hand, I enjoy the thought of being a part in an endless chain of Reflection and Response.

(For example, I am not ashamed to say that my biggest form of admiration for any kind of art is the thought ‘Why didn’t I think of that?’ followed by the thought ‘How can I take that and turn it into something new?’…)

How does your album ‘Away’ fit in with that definition?

FR: I think the album ‘Away’ is on many levels the product of Reflection and Response – it is what we made of music we heard, songs we love, songs we hate, books that touched us, people that surrounded us and places we have been. But it is also what we made of each other and ourselves.

I believe that the urge to write a song results from the need to capture and express a certain feeling. It’s never about which chords might go well together and which words might rhyme. You chase this feeling, this impulse, because it is haunting, like something you have once known but forgotten. And you try to figure out what it is, what it wants to be, how it wants to sound.

I think, in the best case an artist should be like the needle of a record player, materializing an invisible something.

As we were three musicians working together on this album, the most important part was responding to our surroundings in a similar way. Sharing an understanding of the feelings that we wanted to transport in the music we made. And with every musician we brought into the studio, we hoped they would be telling a similar story as we did, adding to what the three of us shared.

Then again, that sounds way more complex than it actually was. In the end we just made music together, simply loving each other for that.

Franz Rothe & Vivi

What else have you been working on recently? What are you looking to work on next?

FR: I’m trying my hand at a couple of different things right now. There are so many languages in which you can express yourself, so I tried to look for other languages like film or writing. Kind of to find an outlet for things that haunted me, but couldn’t find their way out of my head through chords and melodies.

I made a documentary about forced evictions in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, with my dear friend Michael last year. It’s called ‘The Final Days’ and I’m happy about anyone watching it on vimeo.

Right now I actually started writing a book, which has been on my mind for ages. But first novels usually suck, so there’s really not too much to expect there…

Who or what inspires you?

FR: Places. People. My friends. Vivi and Lukas, who are the other two-thirds of the band. Their talent and their ability to always just naturally come up with exactly the right thing – that never ceased to amaze and inspire me!

Generally speaking though, in the best case, absolutely anything could be inspiration. But unfortunately I often have a hard time keeping the open eyes it takes to be aware of what’s actually around me.

So what I do is I travel a lot and try to see and live in as many countries and cultures as possible, to absorb as much as I can.

Is there anything else you would like the Collective to know?
FR: Check out the photographer Ben Zank! I just had the pleasure of meeting him and he is as nice a guy as he is a brilliant artist.
Shout out to…?

FR: Huge shout out to Vivi and Lukas, with whom I made the album ‘Away’ and whom I miss terribly when we are too far away from each other to make music!

Franz, Vivi, Lukas

Reflection and Response.

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